WHERE DID YOU GROW UP ?

I was born in 1976 in Tlayacapan, Morelos (Mexico). I grew up in Tacubaya, which is part of Mexico City.

HOW DO YOU DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE OF ART ?

I would describe my art as contemporary, with a retro and a futuristic tendency. My art is eclectic and humanistic. Humanistic because I am interested in society and in the individual.

WHAT INSPIRED YOUR DESIGN FOR THE MURAL DURHAM EVENT ?

The mural talks about America as a continent. Not a country, but an entire continent that shares the same origins as explained by the theories of the Bering Strait. Nowadays we all coexist, but each one defends their own origin, their own past, and their own tribes. The mural portrays a blending of the traditional American culture, through the Cherokee Indian, the traditional Aztec culture, through the feathered serpent (Quetzalcoatl), and the current Anglo-Saxon American culture, through the colors, the flag and the shoes. The mural works with icons of the past and icons of the present to create a dialogue through a single image.

WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO PARTICIPATE IN MURAL DURHAM ?

 I met Bob Healy in Mexico City 18 years ago. We stayed in contact and a couple of months back, the idea of coming to Duke to exhibit my work arose. I wanted to paint a mural during my stay, and fortunately, the dates coincided with the Mural Durham event.

HOW ACCEPTED WAS YOUR ART PRACTICE IN YOUR COMMUNITY ? HAS IT EVOLVED DURING THE YEARS ?

A lot of people are not prepared to understand art. Doing art in a society that has become indifferent is complicated. Yet, there are some people that do sense that there’s something deeper expressed in my work. I have learned that the act of creation is something very personal…very spiritual. The magic happens in the dialogue between you and your panting, you and you paper, it’s something that happens between you and your work.